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People

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Dr. Joleen Timko

Dr. Joleen Timko

AFRICAD Managing Director

joleen.timko@ubc.ca

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Dr Joleen Timko has more than 15 years of experience in the domain of forests and rural livelihoods research across 32 study sites in 8 countries on 3 continents.  Joleen’s research program on forests and livelihoods in Sub Saharan Africa focuses on the dynamic driving forces and leverage points that occur at the forest-livelihoods interface. She conducts applied, policy-relevant research that addresses poverty, sustainable livelihoods, human health, and conflict, while maintaining a consistent focus on cross-cutting themes such as gender, climate change, and tenure. Joleen has worked professionally with national and provincial governments, ENGOs and civil society, and universities and research institutions. She regularly collaborates with Indigenous and local communities; most recently she has worked with First Nations in Canada’s north, and local communities in Malawi, Ghana and Ethiopia. Joleen is a Research Associate with ForLives: Forests and Livelihoods for Sustainable Development (www.forlives.ubc.ca), AFRICAD’s Managing Director, and an editor of the peer-reviewed open-access journal Madagascar Conservation & Development.

Dr. Patrick Waeber

Dr. Patrick Waeber

Postdoctoral Researcher, Forest Management and Development Lab, ETH, Zurich, Switzerland

pawaeber@interchange.ubc.ca

Patrick Waeber studied the social behavior of the Alaotra gentle lemur in Madagascar for his Masters thesis in Zoology. Committed to remaining involved in conservation in Madagascar after completing his thesis, he created the Malagasy organization Madagascar Wildlife Conservation. He also continues to work as a coordinator for education and conservation for the Jane Goodall Institute (Switzerland) with projects in eastern Africa and Madagascar. As founder and editor of the peer-reviewed open access journal Madagascar Conservation & Development, Patrick is engaged in building capacity and creating a forum of exchange and debate for conservation and development (C&D) initiatives in Madagascar. In the face of a growing human population, Patrick sees the use and allocation of resources as an imminent challenge. He is interested in reconciling conservation and sustainable development – how can the two realms be bridged, and how can C&D best be combined into one field of applied research and implemented into ground actions, in order to alleviate poverty and to maintain viable ecosystems?  Though Patrick is currently a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Forest Management and Development Lab at ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, we continue to find ways to collaborate with him.

Dr. Robert Kozak

Dr. Robert Kozak

Professor, FACT Director

rob.kozak@ubc.ca

Dr. Robert A. Kozak has been conducting research and teaching on sustainable business management practices and issues for the past fifteen years. His work attempts to provide business solutions to complex problems related to sustainable development, forestry, wood products, and the emerging conservation economy. Most recently, Dr. Kozak’s research has led him to study the efficacy of alternative tenure and business models in the Congo Basin of Africa as a means of improving the livelihoods of forest dependent communities in the region.

Dr. John L. Innes

Dr. John L. Innes

DEAN OF FORESTRY

john.innes@ubc.ca

Dr. John L. Innes is the Dean of Forestry and the Forest Renewal British Columbia Chair of Forest Management at UBC. His interests revolve around the implementation of sustainable forest management in its broadest sense, particularly in non-industrial settings. He works with a strong group of graduate students who are researching a range of issues related to sustainable forest management. Particular concerns include the effectiveness of community forest arrangements, the interactions between traditional knowledge and western ideas about sustainable forest management, the potential effects of climate change on forest management and the balancing of different values associated with forests. He is closely involved with forest certification, including both the North American Sustainable Forestry Initiative and the new national standard for China.

Gloria Kendi Borona

Gloria Kendi Borona

PhD Student

kendigloria.yahoo.com

Gloria Kendi Borona has research interests in sustainable management of natural resources and cultural landscapes, and the interface between the two. She has over the last eight years, worked with diverse communities in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and Malawi in programs designed to ensure conservation of natural and cultural heritage and improvement of community livelihoods.  Gloria strongly believes that the answers to the long-term conservation of natural resources lies in constructive engagement with local/indigenous communities. This was reinforced through her interaction/work with the Aboriginal communities of northern Australia /Kakadu National Park. Gloria has worked professionally with international non-governmental organizations, national and local governments as well as bi-lateral agencies in resource management programs. She currently serves in the World Archaeological Congress Council as senior representative for East and southern Africa. For her PhD research, Gloria will pursue three inter-related areas; sustainable management of forest resources through involvement of forest dependent communities, the inter linkages between conservation and development and decentralization of forest management as a conservation strategy.

Some of her work can be found here.

Kirsten Dales

Kirsten Dales

PhD Student

k.dales@unido.org

Kirsten Dales is a Doctoral Fellow in Forest Science and Conservation at the University of British Columbia and research associate for the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). With a special interest in spatial dynamics of land-use change, she draws upon multiple disciplines and scales of inquiry to address issues related to industrial ecology and environmental toxicology in large river-floodplain systems. Through extensive field work in Nepal and Mongolia, Kirsten worked with local communities to conserve water resources, reduce soil erosion and restore degraded lands in climate vulnerable landscapes. In recent years, her interests have expanded from restoration science to encompass theoretical and empirical intersections of political ecology, environmental governance and complex systems thinking. Kirsten’s current research applies a geospatial approach to assess how hydrologic connectivity in artisanal gold mining landscapes affect sediment-bound heavy metal deposition and spatial contamination patterns in northwestern Nigeria. This research is a coordination between UNIDO, AFRICAD and the Forest Research Institute of Nigeria (FRIN).